When I was in Sales and Marketing I learned to interact with people on a completely different level. Before, I always would say “I’m great with people,I can talk to anyone”. Until I actually had to deal with a different person every day. Cold calls taught me that there was a lot more to learn about people. I needed to understand how to impulse people.

First, I learned how to impulse people. If you’ve ever been in sales, you know what I mean. I quickly learned “the 4 factors of impulse.”

-Jones Effect

-Indifference

-Fear of loss

-Sense of Urgency

Jones Effect: People want what those around them have. ie, I was able to help Mary, next door, with the same problem. Or, John, down the street, loved them so much he bought 2 cases.

Indifference: Portraying indifference with the customer can allow you to relate to the customer and not look like a pushy salesman.

Fear Of Loss: This is where you convince a person that they need to act now.. It’s now or never.

Sense Of Urgency: Have a sense of urgency when talking with a customer. ie. “I am here now and I can help you now”. Make it understood that you are here now and will not be tomorrow.

Since my experience with sales and marketing, My online business has grown drastically. I’ve learned that a person has to be closed at the height of what is called “the Impulse Curve”. This simply means that while listening and further questioning a person about their needs and wants, you can start to impulse them. When you realize that your impulse factors are working, quickly close the deal. At this point silence is golden. Now,you put pen to paper.

The beauty of Impulsing is that it can be practiced in many situations in daily life. If you need people to do what you want, this is a good strategy to learn. Sometimes one of the impulse factors will be enough. Practicing and implementing all of them will keep you prepared with a strong arsenal.

Consider these impulse factors bullets,and only use them when needed. Don’t shoot all your ammo all at once! fire them off as needed.



Source by Phil Haro