You would probably instantly think that the church featured in Cecil B. DeMille’s movie, The Ten Commandments, was filmed in Sts. Peter and Paul Church across Washington Square, San Francisco. You’d also speculate where did the sniper shoot from in the first scene of Dirty Harry filmed. The answer would be the Carnelian Room, 52nd floor of B of A building on Montgomery & California, smack dab in the midst of San Francisco.

Yes, San Francisco is known for spectacular movie sets and enough trivia to fill up a book, but unknown to most people. With the glare of Hollywood lights blinding people, only a small number of individuals realize that this metropolis is the perfect set-up and has been utilized by some of the most legendary directors of our time. Who can turn away from the hills, cable cars and unique foliage that is present within this city’s limits? As such, it makes perfect sense then to utilize the same venue as your place for learning the art of filmmaking. And San Francisco film schools are some of the finest in the United States. The city enjoys a diverse treat of performing and media arts, as well as the reputation of being a cultural and intellectual hub.

Some San Francisco film schools offer four-year courses and train any aspiring moviemaker on the craft of directing, editing, producing, cinematography and even acting. Among the majors provided are Associate’s, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees on Theater Arts.

San Francisco film schools also include programs that offer a mentor-apprentice situation with on-the-job training which allows for networking and introductions to industry professionals. These schools are a good alternative from the conventional classroom setting if the student enjoys working in a real life setting with hands-on experience.

In addition to the relationships and experience that is part of the non-traditional film school environment, there are several opportunities to learn exactly how to bring an idea and script to the screen. With so many aspects that need to be taught like financing, marketing and sales, learning from a mentor allows that budding filmmaker to understand how to build their career in a very competitive marketplace. Also, this kind of atmosphere allows you to benefit from the networks formed on a day-to-day basis. Statistics tell us that several graduates of this kind of program get their first job from their mentors.

The director Robert Rodriguez once stated, “Don’t give me any money, don’t give me any people, but give me freedom, and I’ll give you a movie that looks gigantic.” Such a statement appropriately describes what San Francisco film schools are offering. This metropolis shall certainly give you the freedom you need in making your dreams come true.



Source by Alex D Baker